Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 395
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

There are some cooool photographs in it, but I'm not going to publish too many of them yet. The album is an object of some current research on my part. Ruth is top-center in these. Is that Willi enjo

She was a nurse in the Great War...

Posted Images

Rare by NUMBERS or "rare" as in High Priced? :unsure:

Ricky's treasures fall into the Obscure But Unwanted category. :rolleyes::cheeky:

As far as I have ever been able to determine, this is one of 118 gold class National Sports Badges (as they became later) awarded in 1913-14 by the German Olympics Committee

[attachmentid=11866][attachmentid=11867]

I have never been able to discover what the regulations were on these PRE-World War One badges were, which then came in only bronze and gold grades. The regulations shifted fairly constantly-- reference book assertions to the contrary. As far as Official Price Guides go, this one doesn't even exist as a variant-- so I guess that qualifies as "rare," eh?

And here is what makes this little beauty special--

[attachmentid=11868]

Eugen Marcus, Court Jeweller made the earliest DRA badges-- but this is 900 silver gilt. The scan does not do justice to the soft gilt finish.

Here's another silver-gilt obscurity--

[attachmentid=11869]

This is the very LAST Freikorps award, presented in 1934 on the 15th anniversary of the liberation of the Bavarian city of W?rzburg from Red revolutionaries by the accidental arrival of a train of returning troops from Georgia in the Caucasus. Yes, this one will be found with Tamara stars! There are bronze one piece "tinnie" versions of this W?rzburg badge, but this is the three piece silver and gilt "decoration" version, just as the Third Reich put all such badges under the ban except the Baltic Cross, Silesian Eagle, and Bremen's Iron Roland. Exact numbers are unknown to me, but since most of those involved were simply passing through on their ways home, possibly not everyone entitled from 1919 actually got one in 1934. I've never seen an award document, and the badge itself has borne the designation "*" for "none sold publicly to establish market price" in every Official Price Guide since... 1982.

:speechless1: So I guess that would qualify. :beer:

PS I will NEVER show the reverse-- this one IS still SO rare it has not been faked. It is maker marked etc. Anyone who gets one, please contact me to verify marking but do NOT post what the reverse looks like. BAD people read our website, too. :shame:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi both Ricks!

I guess this qualify as pretty much rare... and both on the same "spange"!!!

? Schaumburg-Lippe, Kreuz 4. Klasse mit Krone, Silber, 11 Verleihungen! (OEK 1214)

? Hessen-Darmstadt, Orden des Sterns von Brabant, Ritterkreuz 1. Klasse, gem. Nimmergut 13

Verleihungen! (OEK 856)

Enjoy...

Ciao,

Claudio

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, rare by the numbers awarded! Pricing is not always relevant to rarity.... or in the case of "The Evil Twin"... obscurity! There's a tremendous amount of stuff out there that is scarcer than hen's teeth and few collectors are even aware of it! Hence the theme of the thread!

;>)

Link to post
Share on other sites

This Herzog-Ernst-Medaille mit Schwertern is pretty rare, too. It was created very late in the war by Duke Ernst II. It was meant for military personnel who were native of Altenburg or serving in the 8th Thuringian Infantry Regiment No. 153. In addition, the awardees had to possess at least the IC 1st class first, to be considered for bestowal. This medal became one of the least frequently bestowed Imperial German awards of the war; total number of awards only 86.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Another rare "Steckkreuz" of WWI: the war merit cross of the Principality of Reuss, instituted by F?rst Heinrich XXVIII (!!!). It was awarded for bravery in the presence of the enemy and could go to men irrespective or rank who held the IC 1st class. It could also be awarded to someone who had not as yet earned the IC 1st class but whose deed in action was do distinguished that an exception could be made. I think that this cross was awarded less than 400 if I do remember correctly...

I don't have the picture of my example unfortunately, but I can show one cased gone for quite a lot of many, much more than the starting bid! With the compliments of HH...

Link to post
Share on other sites

This card is certainly not unique, but there can only be very few left elsewhere, and I am confident it can be considered rare.

It once belonged to a certain Oberleutnant Hausser, who served with Infanterie-Regiment 155 and attended the Kriegsakademie in Berlin from 1908 to 1911. He was later to become better known as "Papa" Hausser, "Father" of the Waffen-SS.

Since the Kriegsakademie reference is crossed out, the card probably dates from around 1912 when Hausser was assigned to the Imperial Navy to qualify as an aerial observer.

With the exception of a few signatures of PlM and Knights Cross holders on various documents, this is the only item I have that can be directly attributed to a reasonably well-known historical figure.

David

Link to post
Share on other sites

When it comes to rarity, I have been fortunate to have many interesting things pass through my hands. I have thought about this all day. The first piece i will share is not rare in and of itself. but it is still the only one I have ever seen in the Scharffenberg (House Jeweler, Saxony) presentation case and the only miniature I have ever seen. I will share some "one-of-a-kind" pieces like this with you tonight. The Saxon LS bar is pretty special when resting in its' case on the custom pedestal inside!

Link to post
Share on other sites

And one more for now. Again, only one like this I've seen. Mint in the cello issue packet, mint ribbon in the interior mint packet. Common piece, yep! Like this? Pretty darn hard to find.

Rarity does not have to cost a collector thousands.......... look dilligently and some very simple, but exceedingly rare pieces can be yours for very reasonable prices!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I, like Mr. Research, has one of those "rare" ones ... :rolleyes:

Darrel,

I have a gold one just like that also made by Eugen Marcus.

However, since it doesn't have the silver mark to the right of the catch, I understand that it is the less common gold badge awarded after 1918. Sadly, these are not as uncommon as Rick's silver gilt pre-war type.

Still nice to have.

David

Link to post
Share on other sites

Darrel,

I have a gold one just like that also made by Eugen Marcus.

However, since it doesn't have the silver mark to the right of the catch, I understand that it is the less common gold badge awarded after 1918. Sadly, these are not as uncommon as Rick's silver gilt pre-war type.

Still nice to have.

David

DOH !!!!

:speechless:

Oh well ... I was running neck and neck with Rick for about an hour or so :unsure:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Blog Comments

    • Sounds great other than the Orange & Mango squash only because I prefer cran-pomegranate juice.
    • "(...) disgusting herbal concoction (...)" I took note of this description, to enrich my otherwise limited, English "Wortschatz"...
    • At work the standard indian tea such as PG tips is referred to as chimp tea. This goes back to the days when we had a Spanish girl working for us whose command of the English language was extremely limited. One lunch she said she was going to the shop could she get anything. I asked if she could get a pack of tea bags. She returned with some disgusting herbal concoction. I tried to explain what was required but without success. I then remembered PG tips had a picture of a chimpanzee on the packe
    • When I read Lapsang Souchong i decided to post something about these Tea . Many years ago I dont  know about Lapsang until I read James Michener book Centennial and the description of the savour of the Lapasang as a mix of tar and salt & smoked made me proof . It was exact ! and i liked it since then .
    • I have been known to drink Lapsang Souchong and Tea, Earl Grey, Hot... both "without pollutants". I normally have one mug of coffee in the morning, then spend the rest of the day drinking Orange & Mango squash (by the pint). Then evening comes and it's a pint, followed by red wine with dinner and sometimes a drop of Laphroaig afterwards.
×
×
  • Create New...