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Soviet manufactured, non-Soviet awards


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It's clear that there's a substantial amount of Mongolian awards manufactured in Soviet mint(s) and this partially explains their popularity. Same is true for the earlier North Korean awards. Albania had limited amount of awards manufactured in USSR (in particular the partisan red stars - in gold / silver).

What other countries had (some) awards manufactured by the Soviets?

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Yugoslavia, during the war and immediately thereafter?

Ah yes, forgot about Yugoslavia. Have a partizan red star (with doc) myself - one of the Soviet made ones.

Any other countries?

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Also as i remember war and early after war awards of Poland were produced in Mondvor.

Poland caught me by surprise - my limited exposure to them never gave me the impression that much soviet symbolism was used in Polish awards.

Love those Yugoslav stars by the way! I only have a 3rd class one of soviet manufacture (but WITH award document apparently awarded to a Russian).

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How about the Soviet Afghani medals and orders?

I guess they'd count. On the other hand... they were essentially Soviet medals/orders, right? I.e. USSR was "occupying" the country so it's not like Afhanistan (like Mongolia or DPRK) sourced them from Soviet mint purely for procurement related reasons.

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No the PDR Afghan awards were of an independent country, less occupied than Iraq or Afghanistan or . . . are today (the PDRA government predated the Soviet invasion). I have never seen any marked as having been made in the USSR, but that doesn't mean much. I'd guess they are from another friendly country.

See the various Afghan threads here.

Edited by Ed_Haynes
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OK, point taken - hope I didn't step on any people's toes :cheers:

Reminds me of similar debate I have with my Russian boss sometimes... in the company I work for, she insists that Mongolia should be part of our sales region of former soviet countries... I keep pointing out that Mongolia was never member of Soviet Union... at which point she always points out that Mongolia may not have formally been part of USSR but informally did as Moscow saw fit... and then typically I get an ice cold look that Russian women seem to be pretty good at :off topic::cheeky:

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At least Mongolia never joined the Warsaw Pact (or NATO or . . . ).

Yep - with such a huge landmass and small population, they managed to do pretty well for themselves in not being crushed.

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Hi. I live in Russia, and we have here a lot of non-awarded afgani awards that were taken for sale from the Mondvor.....Also maky awards soviet and afgani have the same details and the same quality.....

Have you ever seen one marked? (Mongolian awards made there, for example, usually are marked.)

Have you ever seen any sources that confirm this?

I am not saying it isn't true, but just that the quality doesn't quite have a Mondovor "feel". I have always guessed East German or Hungarian manufacture.

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It's clear that there's a substantial amount of Mongolian awards manufactured in Soviet mint(s) and this partially explains their popularity. Same is true for the earlier North Korean awards. Albania had limited amount of awards manufactured in USSR (in particular the partisan red stars - in gold / silver).

What other countries had (some) awards manufactured by the Soviets?

* * * * *

I'm in Tbilisi right now. I was looking through a small box of parachute badges last Saturday, sure that there weren't any there that I didn't already have. Whoops, what's this?

Darned if I didn't find what seems to be a Cuban parachute badge. It is a mirror-stamped badge, no provision for a hanger, Cuban flag at the top in place of the red star and the word "TERCERA" in the white canopy below the flag, otherwise identical to the Russian version. Could be a fantasy, I suppose, but my feeling is that it's real. It has a "Pobeda" and "Moscow" screwplate. It's probably common enough but it's the only one I've come across.

Chuck

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