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Original ribbon for the prussian 1813-1815 KDMs


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Whew: :cheers:

very,very nice.

I have always wondered if vets of 1813/14 and 1815 wore the two campaign medals together.

Contemporary accounts mention that they were worn on the battlefield and as the Prussian troops entered Paris.

That original ribbon is a bonus.

Congratulations.

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Here is my arrival! Badly damaged but I like it a lot! There is text on the rim as well. Is it the same system like it was with 1871 Franco-Prussian war medal? Like I understand, its made in Berlin (Cross arms are streight), am I right?

092876410a0d1e_l.jpg

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Right Timo, "mit scharfkantigen Armen" like yours means from the Berlin mint, late 1814, whereas Micha's has "geraden Armen" and is from the earlier Paris striking, if I have this correct. I really like these medals as well. Micha, let me know if you are selling yours......

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Yes, thats the text. Same like I have on 1871 ones. Just was there as well private purchased medals without it?

Vincent, you don't have any of them yet????? :unsure:

Micha medal is VERY good shape! You must be happy camper!

Edited by Noor
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Oh, I see... everybody has one of these! Gee, just when I thought I was special! :cheers: I picked mine up from that same jeweler in Munich, near the Hofbr?u Haus... forty+ years ago... are you ready? For... 50Pfennings,

about 12 1/2? in 1964... So, anybody ever seen ribbon for sale for these...? :rolleyes:

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Although these aren't rare, I find them fascinating. Timo, I have an 1814 like yours, with original ribbon, but I'd like to add a few more. My 3X Great Grandfather got the 1813 for his part in the Voelkerschlacht bei Leipzig, and I have a nice charcoal portrait of him from the 1850's where he is wearing the ribbon in his lapel.

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As usual I am begging your patience. :unsure: . BUT did anyone think the sewn ribbon on my above 1815 KDM is of any significance? I realize ribbons can "come and go" on a medal and can be subject to "tinkering". BUT, this item sort of "talked" to me :blush: . I guess my question is, have awarded medals ever come with the ribbon sewn on?? Whoever did the sewing did a very very neat job. It does not look like a "kitchen table" job. SIGH .. BUT then again, who knows.... :speechless:

Rod

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  • 2 weeks later...

The Traveling Museum :cheers: brought this "from captured guns" medal in today:

It too has been sewn-- but not these ends one to the other-- but to ? clothing and then removed?

It has also been MERCURY coated (! :speechless1: ) which while a lovely anti-corrosive was part of the process which has led us to nuclear proliferation :rolleyes:

http://gmic.co.uk/index.php?showtopic=7073&hl=Cinderella

However, since the Megalito Loveless of Mitteleuropa only figured this process out about the time Young Queen Victoria was putting up the Crystal Palace, we can assume this old warrior was alive in the 1850s....

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As usual I am begging your patience. :unsure: . BUT did anyone think the sewn ribbon on my above 1815 KDM is of any significance? I realize ribbons can "come and go" on a medal and can be subject to "tinkering". BUT, this item sort of "talked" to me :blush: . I guess my question is, have awarded medals ever come with the ribbon sewn on?? Whoever did the sewing did a very very neat job. It does not look like a "kitchen table" job. SIGH .. BUT then again, who knows.... :speechless:

Rod

Hello Rod,

While some Imperial German medals were awarded with the ribbon attached,

I seriously doubt that these medals were awarded with the ribbons sewn on.

The ones that I am referring to, with the ribbon attached, came along about

eighty years after Waterloo.

Regards,

Wild Card

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