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Deciphering a Signature


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Hi,

Can some one have a go at deciphering this signature for me please?  

Regards,

Ian

 

signature.jpg 

FML.jpg

Edited by Ian
correction
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Bayern,

Thanks for the response. I can not find a Grunberger in Schmidt-Brentano's list of Generals.   I am 99% certain that who ever he is he is a Feldmarschalleutnant. 

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It is actually „Großpapa“=Granddad.

You might not find him in the list either for obvious reasons ☺️.

Edited by saxcob
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It makes sense . Grosspapa. Ian : looking the photo I note that the Grosspapa wears what appears to be a Dragoon Oberstleutnant uniform . Light blue with regimental colour collar ,one row of plain buttons and the left shoulder gold and black Achselschlinge of the Cavalry

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My initial thought was he was an Artillery officer, but cavalry is just as probable.   I could not get a clear enough enlargement to be certain.

This one is definitely a signature and it belongs to a Generalmajor...any idea?

 

GM 1917-signature.jpg

GM 1917.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Unfortunately, other than the greeting there is nothing else written  on the reverse.    Now that I know that the first part is Gruss,,,, I can see it, but the remainder is a blur.

Originally when I first looked at it I thought it was Graf......

Edited by Ian
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I stick to my original guess. Also note that the connection line to the ss starts at the top which should make the preceding (round) letter an o rather than an u which looks different (see chart). Appears to be a child's handwriting.

 

p2.jpg

Edited by saxcob
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Thank you one and all for your invaluable input to the issue.   Whilst the jury is divided I am reasonably comfortable with Großpapa.

Regards,

Ian

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With a little bit of phantasy Großpapa is really possible...

It´s a shame, that the "young" germans like me (52) didn´t learn the old scripts in school...

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  • 2 weeks later...

I am 95% sure it is "Großpapa",

On 14/08/2020 at 04:13, The Prussian said:

It´s a shame, that the "young" germans like me (52) didn´t learn the old scripts in school...

I am in my twenties and feel the same, I had to learn it myself...would be nice if at least it would be learned during art class.

Edited by Utgardloki
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I agree it's written "Großpapa".

I'm 62 and Italian, but I thank my parents, both fluent in German, for having taught me the Kurrentschrift (aka "Sütterlin" in a later form), when I was a young boy...

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11 hours ago, Elmar Lang said:

I agree it's written "Großpapa".

I'm 62 and Italian, but I thank my parents, both fluent in German, for having taught me the Kurrentschrift (aka "Sütterlin" in a later form), when I was a young boy...

Dear Sir, I would like to ask you a question that has nothing to do with this question. During the First World War, will soldiers and generals of the Austro-Hungarian Empire wear the medals and orders of the enemy countries (belligerents)?

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1812 , The answer is Yes and No . yes because they were not regulations at the beggining of the War to the matter , No because soon was decided that all the regimental Names were discarded  due to the fact that many were of Monarchs of enemy Powers .

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7 hours ago, Bayern said:

1812 , The answer is Yes and No . yes because they were not regulations at the beggining of the War to the matter , No because soon was decided that all the regimental Names were discarded  due to the fact that many were of Monarchs of enemy Powers .

OK, what about neutral countries? For example, Spain, Sweden

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