Jump to content

Recommended Posts

A small, albeit very nice medalbar. I wonder how unique it is? I've seen Romanian orders before on German pre-ww1 bars, but the Order of the Star is an uncommon one to be sure. I can only recall seeing one or two photo's of officers with this particular order. The Romanian Crown Order on the other hand seems to be more common.

Would there be any collectors out there with awardnumbers to German officers?

Kind regards, Laurentius

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, laurentius said:

Wasn't this bar for sale as a modern composition with original ribbons and awards? I might be mistaken but the combination seems a bit outlandish.

Kind regards, Laurentius

It is certainly an 'interesting'/'odd' combination, not quite sure how that could have come together either. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well Vince, it looks like the major difference between your bar and Komtur's bar is that Komtur's man, Albert Wiesmann, served in the Prussian Reserves and took part in 4 significant battles during the Franco-Prussian War (that, other than the bow on the RAO, of course.) Great little bar!

Edited by Simius Rex
Link to post
Share on other sites

What I find interesting is that the Order of the Star belonging to Komtur has the swords through the cross, whereas Vince's Order of the Star has the swords on top of the cross, almost like the German 'am Ring'. I know this a stylish decision (like with the BMVOx). Could anyone tell me when this change happened and when? Does Komtur or Vince have the earlier version?

Kind regards, Laurentius

Link to post
Share on other sites

A lovely article about the order, but it doesn't say anything about the swords, rather than that they can be placed on top or through the cross itself. There must be someone out there with the answer.

Kind regards, Laurentius

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, graham said:

... Swords on top of the cross were peacetime awards, swords through the cross were wartime awards. ...

 

Indeed the Romanian decoration of Wiesmann seems to be one of the few wartime awards to Germans. At the time of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877/78, when the Romanians fought on the Russian side, there was a station of the Prussian Feldjäger in Bucharest. Very likely Wiesmann was appointed there at this time. His Romanian wartime decoration was first mentioned in the Prussian rank list of 1881, a quite normal delay between a war, the afterwards occuring awards and the publication of these awards in the rank lists.

The deorations with swords on the top of the cross, as to be seen on the bar shown by Vince, were in contrast awards to military personnel in peacetime.

Geschichte des reitenden Feldjägerkorps Titel.JPG

Geschichte des reitenden Feldjägerkorps S. 154 2.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Blog Comments

    • Sounds great other than the Orange & Mango squash only because I prefer cran-pomegranate juice.
    • "(...) disgusting herbal concoction (...)" I took note of this description, to enrich my otherwise limited, English "Wortschatz"...
    • At work the standard indian tea such as PG tips is referred to as chimp tea. This goes back to the days when we had a Spanish girl working for us whose command of the English language was extremely limited. One lunch she said she was going to the shop could she get anything. I asked if she could get a pack of tea bags. She returned with some disgusting herbal concoction. I tried to explain what was required but without success. I then remembered PG tips had a picture of a chimpanzee on the packe
    • When I read Lapsang Souchong i decided to post something about these Tea . Many years ago I dont  know about Lapsang until I read James Michener book Centennial and the description of the savour of the Lapasang as a mix of tar and salt & smoked made me proof . It was exact ! and i liked it since then .
    • I have been known to drink Lapsang Souchong and Tea, Earl Grey, Hot... both "without pollutants". I normally have one mug of coffee in the morning, then spend the rest of the day drinking Orange & Mango squash (by the pint). Then evening comes and it's a pint, followed by red wine with dinner and sometimes a drop of Laphroaig afterwards.
×
×
  • Create New...