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To dress children up in military uniforms was common in the 19th (early 20th) century. Most of this uniforms are of rather poor quality, only approximately imitating adult ones. 

But in this picture it seems to be a tailor made example of very good quality. The scabbard of his sword even has the usual (door induced?) dent.

Could he be of noble birth, being a real army officer? I don't think so as other parts of his uniform seem to be unfitting - the woollen(?) gloves, the shoes... - and the princes I saw in military uniform did all wear real miniature uniforms. (and I actually never saw a cavalry one - if you know one please show)

45small.thumb.png.9b9fd73bd33656290166fe165cfbd380.png

Edited by Utgardloki
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One has to understand, that the military in imperial Germany at that time was highly appreciated and had the highest reputation. Carl Zuckermayr once stated: Evolution begins with a private, but mankind starts at lieutenant.  It was pretty common that people with more income the so called middle and upper class went to a photographer and put their young boys in uniforms to take photos of them in a uniform. Good photographers allways had some uniforms to choose from for their customers. 

Here is another example.

 

K0100Vorw_01.jpg

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10 hours ago, chuck said:

Really great photo of the little prince on the horse. Do you know what awards he is wearing, and if they would be official awards for a very young prince?

 

chuck 

He was the son of an officer from the Husars of HR 17 in Brunswick, I guess that the medal bar belongs to his father who put it on the uniform to get the photo done by a photographer in Brunswick, taken 1907.

So he was no prince, just the young son of an higher officer in the husar regiment 17. That what I meant with my previous post, not every young boy in an uniform was a noble prince, middle and upper class did photos like this too.

Edited by BlackcowboyBS
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Great to know the backstory to this phenomenal photo "hoch zu Ross" ;)

The only thing that made me think my photo could, with a very low chance, show a prince was the high quality tunic. But as I learned the studio in which it was taken might just have had very good props.

I found that WWI one:

2058338662_labw_4-1580504-1(2)-1.thumb.jpg.fd680329a04f2f21d988d12a8a2d7955.jpg

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Utgardloki

the photo of your Husar was taken in a branch of Germany´s largest department store. And though its flaghip store at Leipziger Strasse was of comparable fame to Harrod´s, the photo-studios of the Wertheim stores was more of a merchandise tool to boost sales and not a studio with royal privilege like Studio Bieber, which was only a few meters away of the Leipzig flagship store of Wertheim, or Selle und Kunze in Potsdam.

Here are two photos from my collection with non-aristocratic background and one of the wife of Prinz Oskar, son of KWII, with their two sons at the beach.

GreyC

951093602_xKindBunterRockParade_SalutiertKopie.thumb.jpg.daed9dcb7c5afccca8325457b4938c21.jpg475651163_xInaMarieGrafin_v_Bassewitz_FrauOskarPreuenKinder_MuritzJuli1921Kopie.thumb.jpg.2dc327f040478b2a7602bf8fc325c50c.jpg2017522438_xHusarenuniform_Kind_HalleKopie.thumb.jpg.d2531f4c07b054b66abe544e9a268e0b.jpg

Edited by GreyC
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  • 2 weeks later...
3 hours ago, Deutschritter said:

10 year old Friedrich Wilhelm Victor August Ernst Prinz von Preußen or Joachim Franz Humbert Prinz von Preußen? Hard to say ... who can help?

Hello, I think In Prince Heinrich the brother of William II 

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Albert Wilhelm Heinrich? Yes, surely possible, but that would have been 1872, when the picture was taken, and it looks more like 1890+ ... but I am no expert! Didn't Heinrich (1862) always part his hair in the middle? But it sure looks like his eyes! Thanks! 

Edited by Deutschritter
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